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New Images Offer Sharper View of Apollo Sites NAS

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) captured the sharpest images ever taken from space of the Apollo 12, 14 and 17 landing sites. Images show the twists and turns of the paths made when the astronauts explored the lunar surface. This interactive shows two LRO images of the Apollo 17 landing site. Click and drag on the white slider bar to. The Apollo 12 landing site in Oceanus Procellarum imaged during the second LRO low-altitude campaign. Click to enlarge. [NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University]. This snapshot in time effect is especially evident at the Apollo 12 landing site in Oceanus Procellarum, now known as Statio Cognitum

Some of the most requested LROC images; from newly discovered lunar features to the closest images of the Apollo landing sites since the astronauts left: 21st Century Spacecraft Impacts. 21st Century Landing Sites. New Impacts. Apollo Landing Sites. Apollo S-IVB Impact Sites. Surveyor Landing Sites. Ranger Impact Sites The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was afforded its first of many opportunities to image the six Apollo landing sites July 11 through 15 with its high resolution Narrow Angle Cameras (NACs). These early images show the Lunar Module descent stages left behind by the departing astronauts LRO's orbital imagery and photos taken in situ by the Apollo astronauts will serve to illuminate our ramblings from one Apollo site to the next.All the landing sites lie on the near side of the Moon and were chosen to explore different geologic terrains. Astronauts bagged 842 pounds (382 kg) of Moon rocks, which represented everything from mare basalts to ancient highland rocks to impact.

LRO Images Apollo 12 Landing Site Solar System

  1. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is a spacecraft orbiting the Moon. It is equipped with a high-resolution camera that has captured photographs of Apollo landing sites. We often observe flat-Earthers demanding NASA to prove the Apollo missions with recent photos of the landing sites, and NASA has provided just that
  2. Shown below are all of the currently available LRO Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images of the Apollo landing sites which have been taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Each Apollo landing site can be found in one of the two image pairs and occasionally in both image pairs in cases where the landing site is at the extreme left or right edges.
  3. The photo revealed the landing spots of Apollo 11, Apollo 15, Apollo 16 and Apollo 17. LRO will be used to identify the best destinations for the next journeys to the Moon Richard Vondrak, NAS
  4. NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University . This image from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter shows the Apollo 12 and Surveyor 3 landing sites. This image was released July 9, 2013
  5. This image of the Apollo 11 landing site captured from just 24 km (15 miles) above the surface provides LRO's best look yet at humanity's first venture to another world. When Neil Armstrong took his famous first steps onto the lunar surface, he kicked around the soil. Yes, the surface is fine and powdery.
Apollo 16 Booster Rocket Impact Site Found | NASA

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  1. Comparison of the original 16 mm Apollo 17 LM camera footage during ascent to the 2011 LRO photos of the landing site show an almost exact match of the rover tracks. Further imaging in 2012 shows the shadows cast by the flags planted by the astronauts on all Apollo landing sites
  2. ed from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) narrow angle camera images of the sites. The coordinates are listed here and in Coordinates of anthropogenic features on the Moon by Wagner et al. in the February, 2017 Icarus. The surface times are from Apollo by the Numbers by Orloff
  3. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, LRO, has captured the sharpest images ever taken from space of where three Apollo missions were conducted on the moon's.

The LRO's true first look, left, at the Apollo 11 landing site was taken approximately 4 hours before image M102014464RE. This image is noticeably sharper compared to the above image. Sunlight reflecting off of the LRRR and PSEP is clearly visible in the deconvolved and enhanced versions of this image The Apollo Moon Landing Hoax: Proof Positive That The Recent LRO Images Of The Apollo Landing Sites Were Photo-shopped Fakes! Just a few years back, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), that was at the time circling the moon, was directed by operators at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory to take some pictures of the supposed Apollo. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), capable of descending as close as 31 miles (50 km) from the lunar surface, has photographed all six of the Apollo landing sites in unprecedented detail

Ultra close-up views of the Apollo 11 landing site - image processing by GoneToPlaid.GoneToPlaid's website: http://apollo.mem-tek.com/Dark Fog by Kevin Mac.. LRO Explores the Apollo 11 Landing Site Image Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University Published: October 20, 2017 On November 5, 2011 the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) acquired a high resolution image of the Apollo 11 landing site

LROC's First Look at the Apollo Landing Sites Lunar

LRO Images Apollo 12 Landing Site. [/caption] Back in July when the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter team released stunning images from several Apollo landing sites, it was not possible at that time. From close up they do not reveal the same amount of detail as Apollo video, TV and still images. Could the Lunar Orbiter images have been used to create sound stages or other models to fake the Apollo landing sites? In a word no. There's also a new section looking at Apollo images, the LRO and the USSR's Lunokhod-2 probe

Apollo 12 and Surveyor 3 | NASA

How to See All Six Apollo Moon Landing Sites - Sky

Images of the Apollo Moon Landing Sites Taken By LRO

The imaging system on board NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) recently had its first of many opportunities to photograph the Apollo landing sites. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) imaged five of the six Apollo sites with the narrow angle cameras (NACs) between July 11 and 15, within days of the 40th anniversary of the. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) imaged the Apollo 17 landing site with enough detail to see the tracks of the rover and footprints the astronauts left behind! The detail in these images, provided by the high resolution LROC Narrow Angle Camera, shows evidence of the activities Cernan an NASA published the sharpest images ever taken about Apollo landing site. The pictures, captured by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), document in details the paths that Apollo 12, 14 and 17 astronaut followed during their exploration APOLLO LANDING SITES IMAGED BY LRO! Bad Astronomy By Phil Plait Jul 17, 2009 11:50 AM. Newsletter. Sign up for our email newsletter for the latest science news

NASA Visible Earth: Apollo 11 Landing Site

The imaging system on board NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) recently had its first of many opportunities to photograph the Apollo landing sites. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been circling the Moon for the past few years, snapping away, taking hi-res pictures of the lunar surface from a height of a mere 50 kilometers (30 miles). A few weeks ago, NASA commanded the probe to dip lower, allowing even closer, more detailed shots. Skimming the surface at a mere 21 km (13 miles), it. The LRO probe can dip as low 31 miles (49.9km) from Moon's pockmarked surface. From this height, the spacecraft is capable of photographing in great detail each of the Apollo lunar landing sites. NASA took its first batch of landing site photos in July, just one month after launching the LRO LRO took images of the site in 2009, but these new ones are more detailed due to the lowered orbit, and also a bit clearer due to the angle of the Sun being lower. You can see the lander's. July 17, 2009: NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has returned its first imagery of the Apollo moon landing sites. The pictures show the Apollo missions' lunar module descent stages sitting on the moon's surface, as long shadows from a low sun angle make the modules' locations evident

LRO Looks at Apollo 12, Surveyor 3 Landing Sites | NASA

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Narrow Angle Camera Views of

There is a lot of talk about the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing which is coming up on July 20th, 2009. Of course there are those that still believe NASA faked the entire thing. I wonder if these images will change anyone's mind. The image showing the Apollo 14 landing site shows what the LRO team claims are the tracks of the astronauts as they set up scientific equipment on. Apollo 14 landing site. Apollo 14 landing site Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter view of Apollo 14 landing site. Tracks from a cart used to carry ALSEP equipment from the lunar module Antares are visible in this photo. The inset shows a picture taken from the ALSEP site, looking back at the Antares On Tuesday, September 6, NASA released new high-resolution photos of the Apollo 12, 14 and 17 landing sites, from vantage points as close as 21 kilometers from the surface. The pictures were taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a mapping satellite that has been in lunar orbit since 2009. To date, the spacecraft has sent a whopping.

NASA's lunar orbiter has returned its first pictures of the Apollo moon landing sites. The images — showing the missions' lunar module descent stages accented by their shadows from a low sun angle — may at least prove to die-hard conspiracy theorists that NASA went to considerable lengths to relocate its secret movie studio in the Nevada desert Just in time for the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) team have released images of the Apollo landing sites. These pictures show the lower half of the Lunar Module (LM), the scientific instruments left on the surface, and even the tracks where the astronauts walked! Awesome. Of course, the moon hoax believers will not be convinced by this. In addition to Apollo 11, the Apollo 14, 15, 16 and 17 sites were imaged. LRO has not yet flown over the Apollo 12 landing site when lighting was suitable for imagery, but the spacecraft will be.

Apollo 12 landed on the Moon a little before 1:00 a.m. Houston time on November 19, 1969, four months after Apollo 11. The Lunar Module, nicknamed Intrepid and flown by Charles Pete Conrad and Alan Bean, made a pinpoint landing just 160 meters (520 feet) from the Surveyor 3 probe that had landed two and a half years earlier. On their second EVA, the astronauts retrieved pieces of Surveyor so. Though the Apollo landing still had to deal with plenty of impact craters as seen in the image captured by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). The Moon really is cratered all the way down . Apollo 11 landing site captured by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) from lunar orbit, showing the Lunar Module (LM) and other hardware. LRO and the Apollo 11 Landing Site. NASA has just released some higher-resolution photos of the Apollo 11 landing site taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Detail in these new photos is good enough not only to see the Lunar Module (LM) descent stage but several of the experiment packages left behind, the primary TV camera, and the tracks Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin left as they. Region of Taurus-Littrow valley around the Apollo 17 landing site. Having recently maneuvered into its 50-kilometer mapping orbit around the Moon, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is now. LRO Sees Apollo Landing Sites 07.17.09. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has returned its first imagery of the Apollo moon landing sites. The pictures show the Apollo missions' lunar module descent stages sitting on the moon's surface, as long shadows from a low sun angle make the modules' locations evident

Moon landing hoax: NASA's six lunar landing sites are

Another Apollo celebration event just hit, and boy it's a biggy: NASA released in-orbit photos taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter that show the Apollo landing sites on the Moon, complete. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has been sending back the sharpest images yet of the Apollo landing sites. After the LRO moved into a lower orbit, new images released today let you.

Apollo 50th Resources; Learn About LRO . The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is a NASA robotic spacecraft currently orbiting the Moon in an eccentric polar mapping orbit. LRO data is essential for planning NASA's future human and robotic missions to the Moon. View the Gallery Apollo 17, crewed by Eugene Cernan, Ronald Evans, and Harrison Schmitt, was the final Apollo mission to the Moon. The Lunar Module Challenger landed in the Taurus-Littrow valley on December 11, 1972 and remained there for 75 hours. The landing site is a relatively flat spot among low mountains at the southeastern edge of Mare Serenitatis. The images here are designed for display on <a href.

The LRO images of Apollo 15's landing site shows the first lunar rover tracks on the Moon, and shows where the crew left that first car to drive on the Moon. NASA. Apollo 16's Traverse Ma NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has returned its first imagery of the Apollo moon landing sites. The pictures show the Apollo missions' lunar module descent stages sitting on the moon's surface, as long shadows from a low sun angle make the modules' locations evident Not just one LRO view, but several, because most of the landing sites have several different views taken at different times in the lunar day. We can hammer this point home even more by picking other images from Apollo missions, this time from orbit, and seeing how the details compare with LRO and LO views

Apollo 14 Landing Site. The Apollo 14 landing site was located at 3.65 south latitude 17.47 west longitude, about 30 miles (49.3 km) north of the Fra Mauro crater--the same site selected for the aborted Apollo 13 mission. The hilly region was designated the Fra Mauro formation, a widespread geological area covering large portions of the lunar. In 2012, the LRO mission captured images of the American flags planted at the Apollo landing sites. This one is from the Apollo 17 landing site, via NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University/Phys.org. But those who believe in conspiracy, yet argue that NASA did send mankind to the moon propose another, more provocative conspiracy theory: NASA made it. Apollo landing sites with key location craters (image: NASA LRO) Apollo 11 - Landed 20 July 1969 The first mission to land mankind on the Moon was Apollo 11, touching down in the Sea of Tranquility

GREENBELT, Md. -- NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has sent back its first images of Apollo lunar landing sites. The agency will release the images Friday, July 17, at noon and hold a teleconference at 2 p.m. EDT to discuss the photos and future plans for the LRO mission. Participating in the teleconference are NASA released the first LRO images of Apollo landing sites in July 2009, less than a month after the satellite arrived at the moon. The tracks from lunar rovers, which astronauts used on the final.

Today is the fifty-first anniversary of the Apollo 12 Moon landing. Similar to Apollo 11, many of the goals of this second lunar landing were engineering in nature. However, Apollo 12 astronauts spent three times longer exploring the Moon (a total of about 7.5 hours vs. 2.5 hours), thus having the opportunity to address more science goals This LRO image of the Apollo 17 landing site was acquired on October 1st, 2009. On December 11th, 1972, Apollo 17 touched down on the sixth and final lunar landing mission of the Apollo program The probe has made a 3-D map of the Moon's surface at 100-meter resolution and 98.2% coverage (excluding polar areas in deep shadow), including 0.5-meter resolution images of Apollo landing sites. The first images from LRO were published on July 2, 2009, showing a region in the lunar highlands south of Mare Nubium (Sea of Clouds)

Photos: New Views of Apollo Moon Landing Sites Spac

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) captured the sharpest images ever taken from space of the Apollo 12, 14 and 17 landing sites. Images show the twists and turns of the paths made when the. The Apollo 11 landing site wasn't the only one that the LRO camera (dubbed LROC) photographed: It also snapped pictures of the landing sites of the other five Apollo landings. (The remaining site. LROC NAC Digital Terrain Models (DTM) are made from geometric stereo pairs (two images of the same area on the ground, taken from different view. The Bad Astronomer is one of many readers who wrote to tell us about NASA's release of high-res photos showing the Apollo landing sites.The photos were taken from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and show the traces of earlier visits to the Moon. The satellite reached lunar orbit June 23 and captured the Apollo sites between July 11 and 15 For these new, sharper images, LRO dipped as low as 13 miles (21 km) above the surface for about a month. The brief time and the orientation of LRO in its orbit meant that it could only photograph three of the six landing sites: the second (Apollo 12), third (Apollo 14) and last of the lunar landings (Apollo 17)

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) snapped the high-resolution images of the Apollo landing sites from above that are the sharpest views yet of where the Apollo 12, Apollo 14 and Apollo 17 astronauts touched down on the moon. The space agency released the new photos today (Sept. 6) Moon Landing Sites History. On July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 landed on the Moon in what was one of the most incredible achievements of humanity since its inception. The lunar module, nicknamed Eagle and manned by Neil Armstrong and Edwin Buzz Aldrin, came to rest near the southern shore of the Sea of Tranquility, one of the large lunar basins. Though it had been expected that LRO would be able to resolve the remnants of the Apollo mission, these first images came before the spacecraft reached its final mapping orbit. Future LROC images from these sites will have two to three times greater resolution

LROC's Best Look at the Apollo 11 Landing Site Solar

Over the years, LRO has captured high-resolution images of the Moon for various applications, including those of the Apollo landing sites. Most recently, it had captured images of China's Chang. With the amazing images of the Apollo landing sites taken through NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), the Apollo landing sites are once again significant for today's generation. These images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), released July 17, show. five of the six Apollo landing sites with arrows pointing out the lunar. The images show the Apollo 12, 14, and 17 landing sites in amazing detail. The LRO team was able to capture these images without changing the average altitude of the LRO orbit The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), has done just that, and has taken amazing images of the Apollo landing sites from orbit showing not just the spacecraft themselves, but the lunar rovers. The originally published LRO First Look at the Apollo 15 landing site. Deconvolved and enhanced, 1.0 meters/pixel. Deconvolved and enhanced, 0.5 meters/pixel. The Apollo 15 LRV is the object to the right of the LM descent stage, located on the right edge of the broad shallow crater to the lower right of the LM descent stage, which is casting a.

No problem for NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), which can dip as low as 31 miles (50 km) from the lunar surface, close enough to image each landing site in remarkable detail. LRO's orbital imagery and photos taken in situ by the Apollo astronauts will serve to illuminate our ramblings from one Apollo site to the next The NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was sent to the Moon with the mission to identify safe landing sites for future explorers. But before the probe starts to do that, it had first returned pictures of past explorers landing sites, showing the Apollo Mission's Lunar Module (LM) descent stages sitting on the lunar surface.. The descent stage is bottom part of the LM that stayed. Among LRO's achievements was to take extremely high-resolution photographs of landing sites of several older lunar landers and impact vehicles, such as landing sites from all of the Apollo landing missions (plus Surveyor III near the Apollo 12 site) and the Apollo 13, 14, 15 and 17 Saturn IVB upper stages NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is now undergoing checkout as it circles the Moon. Carrying a powerful imaging system, the LRO Camera, dubbed LROC for short, is being prepared for a roster of science-gathering and sharp-shooting duties — including the imaging of Apollo landing sites

NASA sent the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to the Moon to spy out sites for future manned missions. It doesn't look like they'll be sending anybody to the Moon, but LRO has documented the Apollo landing sites. Astronomy writer and space expert Ian Ridpath takes us to the Moon for a look. - Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites - Astronomy at BellaOnlin The Apollo 12 landing site (green triangle), located in Oceanus Procellarum southwest of Copernicus crater, was studied using (a) the LRO WAC mosaic and (b) the M 3 false color data, which was used to differentiate different mare units on the basis of spectral differences

Third-party evidence for Apollo Moon landings - Wikipedi

Quote: NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has returned its first imagery of the Apollo moon landing sites. The pictures show the Apollo missions' lunar module descent stages sitting on the moon's surface, as long shadows from a low sun angle make the modules' locations evident Images of the six Apollo landing sites acquired by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (2009-). Chang'e-2 (China, 2010-2011) China has sent several probes to the Moon LRO's view of the Apollo 17 landing site (NASA) Apollo 15: Lunar module Falcon came to land in the Hadley-Apennine region, on the mountainous, eastern edge of Mare Imbrium, the Sea of Rains, on August 7, 1971.They were able to explore a winding channel, or canyon, known as the Hadley Rille. This can be seen with larger amateur telescopes when the Sun is shining onto the Moon at the right. Problem 257: LRO and the Apollo-11 Landing Site Students examine a map of the Apollo-11 landing area and determine how well various features will be visible to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter high-resolution camera

SVS: Apollo Landing Sites with Moon Phase

Over the past 10 years, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has collected a vast new lunar dataset that will enable detailed studies across the lunar surface. Join us as LRO project scientist Noah Petro shares perspectives on the Apollo landing sites and sheds new light on future explorations The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit around the moon since June 2009. The $504 million car-sized spacecraft first captured close-up images of the Apollo landing sites in July 2009. There are even anomalies that contradict previous landing site photos. Prior to LRO, the most commonly cited images were pictures of the Apollo 15 landing site taken by NASA's Clementine spacecraft and JAXA's SELENE spacecraft. These images showed what they described as a bright halo within a 150metre radius around the landing site And today, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a NASA research craft that has been circling the moon since 2009, sent home poignant visual proof of that, beaming back the crispest images ever of the Apollo 12, 14 and 17 landing sites. LRO has barnstormed all six lunar-landing sites before, but the new images — while still black-and-white.

LRO Revisits Apollo Landing Sites - YouTub

The imaging system on board NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) recently had its first of many opportunities to photograph the Apollo landing sites. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) imaged five of the six Apollo sites with the narrow angle cameras (NACs) between July 11 and 15, within days of the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), has done just that, and has taken amazing images of the Apollo landing sites from orbit showing not just the spacecraft themselves, but the lunar rovers parked where they were left, and even the trails of bootprints left in the lunar dust by the explorers LRO Snaps Detailed Photos of Lunar Landing Sites. This LRO image shows the Apollo 17 landing site. Officials at the American space agencies have just released several new high-resolution photos of. Apollo 11 and 16 Landing Sites - posted in Major & Minor Planetary Imaging: With the 50th anniversary of the first manned moon landing (Apollo 11) coming up on July 20 I wanted to see if I could improve on my image of the landing site using a 9.25 EdgeHD. So, here is an image that I took on May 11 June 9, 2019 covering both the Apollo 11 and Apollo 16 landing sites (the latter the first Apollo. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) snapped the high-resolution images of the Apollo landing sites from above that are the sharpest views yet of where the Apollo 12, Apollo 14 and Apollo 17.

Enhanced LRO Images of the Apollo 11 Landing Sit

LRO Sees Apollo Landing Sites 07.17.09 NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has returned its first imagery of the Apollo moon landing sites. The pictures show the Apollo missions' lunar module descent stages sitting on the moon's surface, as long shadows from a low sun angle make the modules' locations evident Apollo 17 • Based on the successes of Apollo 15 (planning for 17 started before Apollo 16) the following objectives were defined 1. Sample ancient lunar crust far from the Apollo 15 site 2. Sample young volcanics 3. Increase surface coverage by the orbiting Command Module 4. Perform geophysical measurements in an area with subsurface.

NASA unveils aerial views of Apollo landing sitesMoon Crater Plinius and the Apollo 11 Landing SiteLunar orbiter beams back closeup views of Apollo landing

Lro Images Apollo Landing Sites W00t Universe Today. Nasa Hubble Shoots The Moon. Eli5 How Are There Telescopes That Powerful Enough To See Distant Galaxies But Aren T Strong Take A Picture Of The Flag Neil Armstrong Placed On Moon Explainlikeimfive LRO spots Apollo landing sites in high res. Bad Astronomy By Phil Plait September 6, 2011 8:27 PM. and others from LRO showing the other Apollo sites, will remind us of what we can do when we dream big, reach far, and leap very, very hard. Image credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/ASU The imaging system on board the Lunar Reconnaissance. The orbiter has not only photographed every single one of the Apollo landing sites, but three of them — Apollo 12, 14, and 17 — were imaged with the orbiter's Narrow Angle Camera and annotated.